toronto

Joanne Tod

S. L. Simpson Gallery

In her new series of paintings, Joanne Tod asserts the value of painting and painterliness against the more ascetic qualities of lately trendier art forms—although her only innovation in these very large works is to paint on layers of nylon mesh. The panel underneath appears hazily through the top layer, which is half obscured by figures. All the works replicate a museum or gallery interior, such as the Henry Moore room at the Art Gallery of Ontario, or Matthew Barney’s installation at Barbara Gladstone Gallery in New York. In front of these scenes a couture-clad model appears, hard-edged against the mesh, but seemingly suspended in space. In She Was Here (all works 1993) she floats in front of Shu Lea Chang’s complex video installation, Those Fluttering Objects of Desire, 1992, at New York’s Exit Art. The model seems more real, more solid, more salable than the dimly viewed array of

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