new-york

Julian Trigo

Grand Salon

Julian Trigo’s paintings are more readily thought of as drawings on canvas. This is not only because of the medium used—charcoal on a uniform color ground in each work—but because of the sketchy linear style, and above all the intimate, quasi-pornographic nature of the imagery, which has a richer tradition in drawing than in the more public art of painting.

Trigo depicts children rapt in somehow innocent yet twisted erotic delvings. This is definitely a pregenital phase—the sex play is all mouths and hands. The sense of personal boundaries breaks down; it becomes hard to say where one body ends and another begins. The parts don’t add up anyway. A picture of two androgynous figures—they seem to be boys, but who can tell?—shows five arms in all, aside from things only vaguely anatomically identifiable. Since they look alike as well, you can, as you prefer, find implications of incest or

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