New York

Randolfo Rocha

Elga Wimmer PCC

It’s been five years since Randolfo Rocha’s last one-person show, and those who remember his overtly representational, politically topical paintings of the ’80s might imagine this to be the work of a completely different artist. Gone are the proliferating, disjunctive imagery, the references to Latin American political repression (Rocha was born and educated in Brazil), the clashing colors, the esthetic of excess. Instead, here we encounter rigorously flat, hard-edged, rectilinear, but irregular geometries in severest black and white. These crisp, physically assertive paintings have nothing sensational, nothing seductive about them, and they offer very little ready access. In the tradition of what Joseph Masheck once dubbed “hard-core painting,” even the fact that they are painted on rigid wooden supports rather than canvas underlines the literal, objectlike nature of the work.

But just

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