Kassel/Hamburg

Franz Erhard Walther

Vera Munro/Fridericianum

In 1964, the exhibition of Franz Erhard Walther’s work in Fulda was greeted with great excitement. Today, 30 years later, Veir Loers, the director of the Fridericianum, remembers that exhibition as a “model for the ideas of minimal art, conceptual art, and concrete poetry.” For this reason he reconstructed this early exhibition, using mostly the original works shown in ’64, for the show he mounted at Kassel entitled “Sieben Werkgesaenge” (Seven work songs).

In a rectangular room with a window right off the entrance, there was a square delineated by a ten-meter-long string in the rear right-hand corner. This bordered an empty room, in which a yellow box seemed to float, while against the back wall stood a five-part cushion sculpture made of chamois paper and filled with air. Also against the back wall hung a two-meter-long “flag of words” such as “orgasm,” “Ovid,” “ Pope,” “penis,” all in

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