New York

Rémy Zaugg

Brooke Alexander

One of the few true conceptual painters, Rémy Zaugg relentlessly interrogates painting to reveal the linguistic foundation of perception. Typical of Zaugg’s project would be the paintings, shown here in 1991, which bore verbal notations describing Cézanne’s House of the Hanged Man, 1873. Though Not Here, 1990–95, Zaugg’s new installation, is as reductive, austere, and monochromatic as ever, it is also, in its own fastidious way, a hoot.

Its difference from Zaugg’s other work lies in its calculated simplicity. It consists of 27 seemingly identical, small white-on-white paintings bearing the same inscription, “NOT HERE.” This work clearly deals with context, but not exactly in the manner of institutional critique. After all, it is designed to celebrate, however equivocally, the newly renovated gallery. One’s progression through the unfamiliar reconfigured space becomes a sort of treasure

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