new-york

Matthew McCaslin

Whitney Museum of American Art at Philip Morris

If the natural world seems to have been eaten alive by media culture, Matthew McCaslin would like us to consider the possibility of reclaiming a lost “sublime” experience of nature through video- or television-based technologies. Engineering a return of the repressed, McCaslin gives nature symbolic redemption as the new “sublime” experience of visual simulation by irresistibly dovetailing rank organicism and lush spectacle.

In an earlier installation, Bloomer, 1995, McCaslin used time-lapse photography to record the blossoming of flowers, then accelerated the footage to an unnatural velocity, offering a schizoid, speed-freak version of the Nature Channel. One of the most gorgeous video installations in recent memory, Bloomer effortlessly transformed the prosaic into the uncanny.

This show, a more recent foray into what might be called the “postlandscape” genre, comprised McCaslin’s Harnessing

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