new-york

Jack Risley

Postmasters

Previously, Jack Risley’s work could reasonably be described as Donald Judd-by-way-of-Richard-Tuttle Minimalism. He used (among other things) stacked cardboard boxes and cheapo blankets in various pastels to create objects that simultaneously evoked Judd’s bottom-line corporate aesthetic and Tuttle’s obsessive fragility. Along the way, he also managed to load a good deal more affect into his empties than did either of these artists: Risley’s work was more about psychological states than philosophical ones. This time out, he’s turned his hand to the construction of elegantly half-baked mechanisms: his recent show featured machines apparently designed to do absolutely nothing over and over again. So, for Threefold (all works 1997), Risley took a camera tripod onto which he grafted an armature of six silver one-gallon cans on one end, and some fifty white paper coffee cups (each in its own

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