new-york

Bonnie Collura

Janice Guy

Everybody knows how the “high-low thing” is supposed to work in art. The only movement is from the bottom up, there’s no descending the ladder. Pick your poison—billboards, graffiti, porn, tchotchkes—at street level, it’s visual blight. But when subjected to art’s miraculous powers of transformation, dross turns to gold. This process is less a mystery than a straightforward colonization. Pressed into the service of a canonical regime, made to speak its language, to reflect its histories and traditions, the once-offending element becomes newly enculturated and art triumphs. But what if art’s power were supplanted by the pumped-up and persuasive machinery of emerging digital technologies that collapses distinctions between entertainment and information, provides access to interactive sites, and delivers advanced visual effects? Bonnie Collura’s sculptural installation, To the third . . . ,

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