paris

Ange Leccia

Musée d'Art moderne de la Ville de Paris

Conceived as an “artificial night,” Ange Leccia’s exhibition “Pacifique” was plunged into darkness and punctuated with stations formed of video images on large screens. One could argue that video projection is no longer simply a mode of representation, but has been transformed into a fluid and synthetic medium. In Leccia’s exhibition, it transported the viewer to a place where the world is no more than a trail of lights, a fleeting cartography of points and lines.

The turn to video in “Pacifique” marked a departure for Leccia, a central figure in the art world during the ’80s in France, known for working with readymade objects. This rupture is only superficial, however, as his work has always involved an escape into emotion and memory. In Leccia’s earlier compositions (which he called “arrangements”) of televisions, projectors, and vehicles of all types, including luxury cars, trucks, police

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