New York

Ken Weaver

6th @ Prince

In “Knotts’ Landing,” Ken Weaver’s first one-person show, the artist’s suite of ten paintings staged a confrontation between two icons of popular culture: Don Knotts, the buffoonish, ectoplasmic sidekick of the television series The Andy Griffith Show, and UFOs. Part of what prevented this pairing from being merely smirky nod to The X-Files was an allegorical element (one that was revealed in the press release): to Weaver, the abducting UFO represents art-world spaces like the gallery and the museum, while Knotts is a stand-in for the artist-as-abductee. This iconology lends the images a comic reflexivity: the UFOs reveal the menacing-yet-desirable, otherworldly aspects of art institutionality, while the abjectly cowering Don Knotts is a place-holding self-portrait of the artist who both craves and fears the scary transcendence of art-world captivity. Though Knotts’s presence was limited

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