New York

Adam Cvijanovic

Richard Anderson Fine Arts

Adam Cvijanovic’s Monument Valley, 1999, is a full-gallery installation, a floor-to-ceiling, seventy-six-and-a-half-foot-long landscape painting spanning four walls, ostensibly portraying the desert terrain where Arizona meets Utah, a region familiar to anyone who has ever watched a Hollywood Western. This handpainted rendition of an exterior region meant to be experienced as interior art recalls the popular cycloramas of the nineteenth century, which afforded spectators three-hundred-and-sixty-degree painted vistas of a given landscape. But unlike a typical panorama, there is no seamless narrative or comprehensive view. Cvijanovic’s eclectic approach to his subject suggests another nineteenth-century precedent, the exotic wallpapers of Jean Zuber, who evoked colonial scenes and foreign locales without being overly concerned with historic, ethnic, or topographic accuracy. At the same time,

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