cologne

Andreas M. Kaufmann

Galerie Rivet

In 1962, the Hungarian composer György Ligeti premiered his Poème Symphonique, a musical piece for a hundred metronomes. By positing the metronome as the performer of the concert (the pendulum weights were set so that each beat at a different speed), the work inverted the normal functions and roles of practical aids and musical instruments. Although he was perhaps not explicitly referencing Ligeti, Andreas M. Kaufmann practiced a similar reversal in his recent exhibition “Move,” distributing twenty-seven metronomes across five levels of scaffolding and the gallery floor. The uneven clicking of the metronomes marking various times filled the space with what sounded like a concert given by a host of neurotically chirping crickets.

Viewers were confronted by more than just this acoustical attack. Kaufmann paired each clicking metronome with a television monitor displaying views of the gallery

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