reviews

Meg Stuart

Judson Church

In her latest solo performance, choreographer Meg Stuart gives new meaning to the phrase “body language.” Not the leg-crossing, tie-straightening, behavioral kind that we might find in Pina Bausch’s dramatically staged battles of the sexes in the ’80s, nor even the speeded-up eloquence of Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker’s brutally beautiful body phrasing of ’90s Gen Xers in Europe. Rather, Stuart’s Soft Wear [first draft], 2000, only fourteen minutes long, is body language for the Internet crowd, for those who prefer morphing to metaphor, multitasking to single-channel vision, and flickering pictures that never hold still to the slow pan of a steady camera.

In Soft Wear, Stuart stands in the beam of a bright spotlight. Her body is precisely articulated: Triceps run along the bias against well-constructed shoulders; tendons stand out like scaffolding from jaw to sternum. Barefoot, wearing dark

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