New York

Sarah Sze

Marianne Boesky Gallery

As if painting in space with everyday objects, Sarah Sze endows her elaborately theatrical installations with a delicately humorous poignancy that counteracts all the gee-whiz grandiosity. In their logic of clutter and accumulation, the artist’s earlier Venice-Carnegie-Whitney projects earned comparisons to the everything-but-the-kitchen-sink installations of Judy Pfaff, Jessica Stockholder, and Jason Rhoades. In this show, her first solo gallery exhibition, the work was more reminiscent of the sculpture of Cornelia Parker or Tom Friedman, if one could imagine their obsessive Minimalism maximalized; spatial and temporal suspension seemed the guiding principle here. Consisting primarily of disassembled and elaborately refused bedroom furniture, it also felt more vulnerable than her institutional installations; the furniture’s association with body parts emphasized this sense of proximity

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