New York

Marco Maggi

123 Watts

MARCO MAGGI'S WORKS have a sense of ethereal expansiveness despite their modest-to-diminutive dimensions. Cryptic inscriptions run all over the Uruguayan artist's metal rulers, rectangles of Plexiglas, sheets of aluminum foil, and real McIntosh apples; conjoined cells of various shapes are filled in with straight lines, dashes, and curlicues; scattered shapes are reminiscent of everything from sails and tents to sword handles and dense enclaves of buildings (in cross-section and bird's-eye views). The effusive script evokes ancient languages as well as aerid maps, bridging medieval cities and space-age circuit boards—or, as the title of one work puts it, “preColumbian and postClintonian.” Maggi's technique for this “text” is a form of drypoint etching that is paradoxically irreproducible—or when it is reproduced (say, in the shadows cast by lines in Plexiglas), it's immaterial.

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