Brussels

Gerhard Richter, Vier Glasscheiben (Four panes of glass), 1967, Installation view.

Gerhard Richter, Vier Glasscheiben (Four panes of glass), 1967, Installation view.

“Voici”

BOZAR - Centre for Fine Arts

It is possible to say, if one has a slight taste for paradox, that from the very beginning there has only ever been contemporary art, and so the history of art in its entirety could be described as an interminable succession of contemporary moments. There is something of this Zeno-esque perspective in the subtitle of “Voici: 100 Years of Contemporary Art,” a show that presented such unusual pairings as Jeff Koons and Rodin, Sue Williams and Manet. The inclusion of Manet alone suffices to demonstrate that the strict limits of the century were blithely transgressed; in fact, the oldest work on view was a “photogenic drawing” made by Fox Talbot in 1839–1840, while the most recent contributions—commissioned for the occasion from Michael Snow, Dan Graham, and Sylvie Blocher—dated from just last year.

The cover design of the book that accompanied the exhibition (it’s only partly a catalogue—much

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