reviews

  • Left: Henri Matisse, Le Luxe I, 1907, oil on canvas, 82 2/3 x 54 1/3“. Right: Pablo Picasso, Boy Leading a Horse, 1906, oil on canvas, 86 3/4 x 51 1/2”.

    Left: Henri Matisse, Le Luxe I, 1907, oil on canvas, 82 2/3 x 54 1/3“. Right: Pablo Picasso, Boy Leading a Horse, 1906, oil on canvas, 86 3/4 x 51 1/2”.

    “Matisse Picasso”

    Tate Modern

    If the Kimbell Art Museum’s 1999 “Matisse and Picasso” had needed a complement, then “Matisse Picasso,” the touring exhibition organized by Tate Modern, the Grand Palais, and the Museum of Modern Art, would surely be it. But it didn’t, and it isn’t, not really. So what is it?

    The answer will have to be comparative, at least as a start.

    The Kimbell title, with its conspicuous conjunction, “Matisse and Picasso,” suggested a story. Jack and Jill went up the hill. And that is just what the show delivered, in four “acts,” from 1930 to 1954, with a prelude and a coda too. The curator, Yve-Alain Bois (

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  • Liam Gillick

    Whitechapel Gallery

    “The Wood Way” brought together a selection of twenty-eight works from two ongoing series produced over the past six years—the “What If? Scenarios” and the “Discussion Islands.” The exhibition title is a literal translation of the German word Holzweg, which denotes a pathway cut by loggers. Read metaphorically, it aptly indicates the prospect of losing one's way among the meanders and thickets of an oeuvre that is both diverse and diversionary, for while Gillick's practice to date has encompassed a wide range of media and activities (including sculpture, writing, architectural and graphic design,

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  • Chris Ofili

    Victoria Miro Gallery | Mayfair

    The very idea of the Rothko Chapel has always bugged me. Do modern paintings really need to bear the weight of the world, and must their viewers contemplate with religious awe the paintings' failure to do so? Well, you can imagine how I felt on discovering that a large part of Chris Ofili's first show in England since winning the 1999 Turner Prize was, in all but name, the Ofili Chapel. A long, specially constructed interior, dimly lit, was lined on either side with a sequence of six paintings, each bathed in its own halo of light, leading as if in procession toward a single larger canvas at

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