london

Paul Morrison

aspreyjacques

Black was everywhere in this show—in the treated film imagery, in the darkened projection space, and in the painting’s bifurcating forms, which promised to bleed off the canvas and onto the surrounding black walls. What Paul Morrison managed, though, was to hold in abeyance any sense that this darkness was unremitting. Instead, he invited viewers to find from within their own experience whatever color there might be in his starkly black-and-white works. A large painting of tree branches in silhouette against a white ground hung in one space, the walls of which had been painted black. In the other room Morrison played a short film—barely two minutes long—looped onto DVD. Both works bear the same title, Cambium, 2002.

The cambium is the part of a tree just below the bark, in which the plant’s new growth occurs, the cellular deposits forming each year’s growth ring. Morrison’s

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