new-york

Donald Moffett

Marianne Boesky Gallery

As critics increasingly lament video art’s dependence on the “black box,” many artists have been trying to revise the shopworn standards, technical and formal, for projecting images. Donald Moffett’s tactic has been to allow the distinct representational strategies of painting and video to collide in ways that highlight certain historical preconceptions about each medium. For his latest New York show, Moffett eschewed the kind of relatively direct digital analogy to painting seen recently in the work of artists like Jeremy Blake; instead, he took on painting’s familiar visual field as a support structure for the moving image.

The exhibition, titled “The Extravagant Vein,” contained eight works, each made up of a video projected, in exact alignment, onto a stretched, painted canvas. This underlying structure, a web of drips and skeins of oil and enamel paints, makes obvious reference to the

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