New York

Clockwise from left: Diller + Scofidio, “Scanning: The Aberrant Architectures of Diller + Scofidio,” 2003. Installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Photo: Michael Moran. Diller + Scofidio, Slow House (Woodblock model with X-rays), 1989, wood, glass, silk screen on glass, and steel, 4 x 16 x 20“. Diller + Scofidio, His/Hers Towels, 1993, embroidered towels, each 51 1/2 x 26 1/2”.

Clockwise from left: Diller + Scofidio, “Scanning: The Aberrant Architectures of Diller + Scofidio,” 2003. Installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Photo: Michael Moran. Diller + Scofidio, Slow House (Woodblock model with X-rays), 1989, wood, glass, silk screen on glass, and steel, 4 x 16 x 20“. Diller + Scofidio, His/Hers Towels, 1993, embroidered towels, each 51 1/2 x 26 1/2”.

Diller + Scofidio

Whitney Museum of American Art

Clockwise from left: Diller + Scofidio, “Scanning: The Aberrant Architectures of Diller + Scofidio,” 2003. Installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Photo: Michael Moran. Diller + Scofidio, Slow House (Woodblock model with X-rays), 1989, wood, glass, silk screen on glass, and steel, 4 x 16 x 20“. Diller + Scofidio, His/Hers Towels, 1993, embroidered towels, each 51 1/2 x 26 1/2”.

For all the recent talk of blurred boundaries between architecture and the visual arts, nobody’s made much of a splash in both fields since Michelangelo hit Saint Peter’s. The twentieth century spawned its share of architect/artists, such as Le Corbusier, Theo van Doesburg, and Tony Smith, but all were more renowned for their work on one side of the disciplinary divide than the other. Recently, artists as diverse as Vito Acconci, Pierre Huyghe, and Jorge Pardo have tried their hand at some form of architecture, while numerous architects have submitted their drawings and even sculptures to the glare of gallery lights. Today the architects Diller + Scofidio are our most fashionable fence-sitters, known less for buildings than for their work in performance and video, as well as their much-acclaimed exhibition designs. Yet the team’s recent retrospective at the Whitney Museum, “Scanning:

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