Berlin

Nils Norman

Galerie Christian Nagel

The clear message of social and political critique once projected by Nils Norman’s work has become opaque in his latest computer-based pictures. Gone is the diagrammatic approach in which well-organized groups of images are directly accompanied by concise, often humorous texts elucidating the artist’s position on the urban environment’s present failings and future potential. His new ink-jet prints on coated Alu-Dibond panels are still generated with Illustrator, his preferred software program, but the pictorial elements now float, unmoored and relatively decontextualized, against lush red backgrounds. What once came across as an unequivocal assault on restrictive and misguided civic policies has become more playful and less didactic, almost poetic in its visual effect.

Despite the change of tactics, Norman’s customary references to protest culture are not absent. A recognizable narrative

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