new-york

“Tokyo Girls Bravo”

Marianne Boesky Gallery

Childhood is no longer what it was in the days of Rousseau and Wordsworth: It’s lost its innocence. Especially in Japan—at least as it emerges in “Tokyo Girls Bravo,” a gathering of work by ten mostly under-thirty artists curated by Takashi Murakami (who organized a pair of smaller exhibitions with the same title back in 1999 that included some of the same artists). Murakami, the promoter of all things “superflat,” is, of course, a past master at giving childlike imagery nasty and malicious overtones. The consummate professionalism with which he approaches his work as an image producer, however (taking Andy Warhol’s “factory” concept several steps beyond anything its originator ever imagined), neutralizes the discordant emotions his work seems meant to emblematize. One might have expected something similar—a batch of assiduous Superflatterers?—from a group show curated by the artist.

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