new-york

AA Bronson

John Connelly Presents

For twenty-five years, AA Bronson lived and made art as part of General Idea. The Canadian trio mimicked and mutated mass-cultural forms from beauty pageants to boutiques to glossy magazines, always returning with vertiginous glee and cutting irony to the intricacies of creating an identity in a media-saturated society. Bronson’s work since the 1994 AIDS-related deaths of Felix Partz and Jorge Zontal, his two partners in GI, has become more personal and less sportive: The most powerful image in the 2002 Whitney Biennial was his deathbed portrait of Partz, and in an interview published this year in arts journal Border Crossings, Bronson said, “There’s no longer any irony in my work.”

How, then, to take Bronson’s latest project, which centers on the giggle-inducing notion of butt massage, as a healing act no less? Per Bronson, one keisters away deep shame and trauma like drugs during a strip

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