new-york

Rachel Harrison

Greene Naftali Gallery

Unlike Rachel Harrison’s previous exhibitions, this one didn’t evade the fact that it was a showroom full of sculptures, autonomous things, standing there in plain view, whether openly embarrassed or glamorously opaque about their status as aesthetic commodities. Harrison’s best works seem to sculpturize an ambivalence about the job a work is meant to do: I show myself, you see me, value is in question, now what?

Two works used video, one, Gray or Roan Colt, shot at a swanky horse auction in Saratoga Springs, New York, the other, Hail to Reason, at a backwoods auction of scarcely desirable junk in the Catskills (all works 2004). By aligning her sculptures with the horses and the junk, Harrison reminds us that viewing art is also a kind of bidding or speculating. In the most concrete terms, they give form to the problem of having to show up and produce value in the art world, a situation

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