new-york

Gabriel Vormstein

Casey Kaplan

In a startlingly literal attempt to connect his works and anchor them to their context, Gabriel Vormstein, in his recent New York debut at Casey Kaplan, went so far as to bind his delicate paintings together with wire and dot the gallery floor with rocks. With just a handful of exhibition appearances to his name, the young Berlin-based artist is sufficiently inexperienced that the gesture might have signaled a lack of confidence were it not consistent with a lyrical aesthetic informed by a web of cultural references, chief among them the material experiments of arte povera.

In giving this show the convoluted title “Seems to B: Soddisfaction, Incomplection, Putrefaction,” Vormstein alluded to a kind of creative posthistory in which the work of art marks not the conclusion but only the beginning. Just as arte povera rescued the spare and the perishable for art, Vormstein, too, revels in the

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