reviews

Jesper Just

Perry Rubenstein Gallery

It begins with a ringing phone. A middle-aged man picks up the receiver and begins, not the expected conversation, but a delicately sung duet with a much younger man on the other end of the line. Their facial expressions are difficult to read and their performances are highly mannered, but the exchange is obviously charged with emotion. The strangeness of the episode is amplified by its details: The protagonists are not only seated within earshot of each other in the same dimly lit club lounge but also surrounded by other men, each sitting by his own phone and apparently awaiting a similar call. As the senior vocalist delivers his final line, we see that the junior has slipped out of the room, leaving the receiver off the hook.

Jesper Just’s short film The Lonely Villa (all works 2004), shown on a wall-mounted monitor as part of the artist’s recent New York solo debut at Perry Rubenstein

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