San Francisco

Reuben Lorch-Miller

Catharine Clark Gallery

Liminal space was the operative theme in Reuben Lorch-Miller’s recent exhibition at Catherine Clark Gallery. Visually and verbally, formally and conceptually, Lorch-Miller’s photographs, sculptures, videos, and wall-painted texts consistently explore the idea of ambiguity. Eight selections from a series of color digital enlargements titled “From the Oblivion” (2003–2005) set the tone here. Their subjects appear arbitrary—a tornado, a snowy mountain, a heavy-metal musician—though the spirit of Richard Prince’s early appropriations hangs heavily over them all. Lorch-Miller’s works originate in digressive Web-surfing sessions during which the artist plucks images from the ether and carefully edits them into obliquely connected groups.

Enlarged to a scale at which their pixels begin to lose definition, the subjects of “From the Oblivion” threaten to become more ambiguous still, yet they remain

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