Hudson

Chris Gentile

Jeff Bailey Gallery

Operating in a conceptual space populated by artists like James Casebere and Thomas Demand, Chris Gentile’s recent work is a hybrid of sculpture and photography that asks interesting questions about the nature of both. Like these better-known contemporaries, Gentile’s sculptural practice is in this case a disembodied one, manifested only in the context of photos—a move calculated to probe the indexical gaps between things and their depictions. In contrast to the form’s more architecturally oriented pioneers, however, Gentile doesn’t pursue totalizing verisimilitude for his meticulously crafted sources. Instead, his images of his own quirky, amiable sculptures—stylistically varied but at their best suggesting low-key versions of the carefully crafted surrealism of Jim Hodges or Tom Friedman—typically treat their subjects as discrete objects, choosing not to draft them into encompassing

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