london

Rezi van Lankweld

The Approach

For the longest time, following the example of a writer I considered nearly infallible, I thought the adjective that defined the quality inherent in clouds, rocks, and so on that permits us to see various things in them—perhaps most notoriously the face of Christ—was “magmatic,” and that this word got at the shifting quality of their anthropomorphism. It’d be a fair descriptor of Rezi van Lankveld’s paintings, too, had I not just looked “magmatic” up and found that, oops, it pertains exclusively to the actions of magma. Even so, at a stretch into geological metaphor it fits the Dutch painter’s work, whose polymorphous allusiveness arises from the solidifying of semichaotic liquid events.

Van Lankveld paints flat on panel, pushing her diluted oils around wet-on-wet without an advance idea of what the eventual form will be—so explains catalogue essayist Zlatko Wurzberg, anyway. The process

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