reviews

Michael Auder

Sextant et plus

“Auder is a poet of moods, brief encounters, tragic moments of our miserable civilization. When I used to visit him at the Chelsea Hotel, around 1970, the video camera was always there, always going, a part of his house, a part of his life, eyes, hands. It still is. A most magnificent love affair: a life’s obsession.” These words, written in 1991 by Jonas Mekas, the other pope of the cinematic diary, confirm the importance of Michel Auder, today an illustrious unknown in France, an artist who in New York attained mythic status without ever becoming famous. Now reparation has been made with a retrospective showing most of his videos, films, and photographs.

Born in Soissons, France, in 1944, Auder moved to Paris in his late adolescence and worked there as a fashion photographer. He then became associated with the Zanzibar group, a collective of experimental filmmakers led by Philippe Garrel.

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