Rome

Antonio Riello

Galleria d’Arte Contemporanea

In 1997, Antonio Riello anonymously posted on the Web a video game entitled Italiani brava gente, 1995, named after a Neorealist war movie known as Attack and Retreat in English but literally translated “The Italians, Good People.” The player had to shoot down all the dinghies of illegal Albanian immigrants who were attempting to disembark on the Italian coast, so they would not rape the Italian women and rob the stores. The game (still available on the Web) enraged many, especially those who never noticed the initial screen showing the geographic positions of Italy and Albania, with their respective per capita incomes (in 1997, $15,300 for Italy and only $350 for Albania); a search for this “neo-Nazi hacker” was unleashed.

Riello then created “Ladies Weapons,” 1998–2003, a series of what appear to be light arms, automatic rifles, pistols, and hand grenades—in loud colors, sheathed in fur

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