Columbus

Two views of Robert Gober, Untitled, 1997, leather, wood, forged iron, cast plastics, bronze, silk, satin, steel, beeswax, human hair, brick, fiberglass, urethane, paint, lead, motors, and water, overall: 10' 2 1/2“ x 8' 8” x 6' 3“; aboveground: 35 1/2 x 35 1/2 x 40”. Photo: Sven Kahns.

Two views of Robert Gober, Untitled, 1997, leather, wood, forged iron, cast plastics, bronze, silk, satin, steel, beeswax, human hair, brick, fiberglass, urethane, paint, lead, motors, and water, overall: 10' 2 1/2“ x 8' 8” x 6' 3“; aboveground: 35 1/2 x 35 1/2 x 40”. Photo: Sven Kahns.

“Part Object Part Sculpture”

Wexner Center for the Arts

WHAT IF THE CATCHPHRASE “the legacy of Duchamp” did not evoke Brillo boxes, factory fabrication, Conceptualism, or any variant of the word critique? What if “Duchampian” were instead to signify that which is hand-replicated, erotic, and (to use Eva Hesse’s favorite word) absurd? What if the wellspring of art since World War II were to be found not in the mass-made objects Duchamp bought and recontextualized in the teens, but in the crafty way he remade and repackaged them decades later?

This is the scenario posited by “Part Object Part Sculpture.” In a tour de force of selection and juxtaposition, curator Helen Molesworth uses the work of twenty artists to put forward a tightly focused alternative to received histories of sculpture since the midcentury. Her revisionist view starts not with the store-bought urinal or typewriter cover, but with their handmade mini-me’s, cunningly packaged in

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