new-york

Saul Fletcher

Anton Kern Gallery

“But what does the painter think about his work—which in itself appears to be unresolved—being framed, enclosed, placed in an interior?,” a journalist wrote in 1920, after visiting Piet Mondrian’s Paris studio. “His studio answers for him. The walls of the room . . . are hung with painted or unpainted canvases, so that each wall is actually a kind of larger-scale painting with rectangular fields.” Saul Fletcher’s photograph, Untitled (Fog and Rain), 2005, which shows a loose pattern of black vertical lines on a roughly painted surface, recalls Mondrian’s 1915 Pier and Ocean, but a comparison between the two artists sheds more light on process than on style.

As Mondrian’s visitor’s observation suggests, the studio is a place where an artist may assert control over context, and Fletcher exploits this potential to the full. Treating one wall of his studio as a changeable platform for improvisation,

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