new-york

Sherrie Levine

Paula Cooper Gallery | 534 West 21st Street

Since she came on the scene in the mid-1970s, Sherrie Levine has made art that couldn’t exist without that which came before it. Levine’s insistence on her project’s inherent secondhandness has meant that her work is often understood as illustrating the toppling of “originality” and “authenticity” by the bowling ball of postmodernism. Yet, as much as her infamous reworkings of extant “masterworks” (by Walker Evans, Egon Schiele, Constantin Brancusi, and the like) have operated to critically account for inequities in art’s production and reception, they have succeeded, too, in nudging otherwise opposing strains into grudging conversation. Indeed, Levine’s oeuvre might be seen as what Deleuze would call a minor—and I would call a feminist—literature, constructed from the discords of the “major” it baldly siphons from.

“I don’t think it’s useful to see dominant culture as monolithic,” Levine

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