New York

Eva Hesse

The Jewish Museum/The Drawing Center

Eva Hesse has (quite rightfully) long been established as one of the most significant artists of her generation, and aside from calling attention to, say, less canonical works or emphasizing previously unplumbed historical correspondences, most recent reviews have taken her “excellence” as a given, often focusing not on Hesse’s oeuvre itself but on the methodologies used by curators and catalogue writers who take the artist’s short, tragic (and thus mythic) career as their subject.

In this respect, “Eva Hesse” has become as much a signifier as a proper name, sparking ongoing debates around the (in)compatibility of formalism and biography; whether Hesse’s guarded interests in issues of gender can be called protofeminist; and whether hers are sculptures that refer to painting, paintings that refer to sculpture, or a third variant altogether (Anne Wagner has called Hesse’s “an art caught up

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