New York

Rivane Neuenschwander

Tanya Bonakdar Gallery

Reviewing “Tropicália: A Revolution in Brazilian Culture” at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, in these pages earlier this year, Irene Small asked what it suggests for this short-lived movement, comprising visual arts, music, theater, and cinema—inaugurated by an installation of Hélio Oiticica’s, and fully extant only from 1967 to 1969—to have enjoyed such a long (and long since institutionalized) afterlife. “If Tropicália’s decentering power rests on a permanently shifting periphery,” she asked, “what does it mean that history ended up on its side?” Like so many momentarily disruptive avant-gardes, the punctual interruption of Tropicália subsequently assumes a canon. Maybe this inversion is inevitable, or even desired. But its influence now threatens to overwhelm more recent interventions by Brazilian artists like Rivane Neuenschwander, who while surely activating this

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