chicago

David Lieske

Rowley Kennerk Gallery

“As a term, pluralism signifies no art specifically. Rather, it is a situation that grants a kind of equivalence; art of many sorts is made to seem more or less equal—equally (un)important. Art becomes an arena not of dialectical dialogue but of vested interests.” In his 1985 essay “Against Pluralism,” Hal Foster aligned the ideology of pluralism with the function of market forces. Today, that correspondence is an all-pervasive reality, clearly evident—colored by varying degrees of self-awareness—in the work of such artists as the young German David Lieske.

Lieske recently enjoyed his first US solo exhibition, a two-part installation titled “il mio solo e la realta (my only idol is reality) (room I + II)” that was so welcoming of coincidence and misunderstanding as to appear, ultimately, arbitrary. In the first part of the show, a thirteen-minute 16-mm black-and-white film was projected

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