new-york

Frederick Kiesler

The Drawing Center

Having contributed to Dada, Surrealism, and later De Stijl, Ukraine-born, Viennese-American architect Frederick Kiesler offered a biomorphic conception of space that became a counterpoint to the rectilinear forms of architectural high modernism. Kiesler is perhaps best known for his interest in the “correlations” between artwork, individual, and environment, a theory he termed “Correalism,” and for his oft-revisited, yet never-built, Endless House, 1947–61. To look at this work now is not only to encounter a playful psychedelic consideration of architecture’s bearing on perception but also to find a key to the post-Minimalist experimentations of Dan Graham, Robert Morris, and Sol LeWitt; the media-utopias of Raindance Corporation, Ant Farm, and Radical Software; and even the more recent spatially dispersed works of Rirkrit Tiravanija, Martin Beck, and Christian Philipp Müller.

At the Drawing

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