new-york

Pablo Picasso

Acquavella Galleries

“Picasso’s Marie-Thérèse” is a dream show, and not only because its key work is The Dream, an iconic portrait of Marie-Thérèse Walter. The sitter, depicted in what is widely overinterpreted as a masturbatory reverie, enjoys a prominent place in Picasso’s long succession of muses. Even if not every i has been dotted and not every t crossed regarding that fateful meeting on January 8, 1927, between the forty-five-year-old cruising titan and the seventeen-year-old girl he picked up in front of the Galeries Lafayette, we do know that, on crossing paths with Picasso, she had no idea of his sensational fame.

But what is not in doubt is that this chance meeting—how very Dada of them—inaugurated one of the great philanderer’s supreme thematic suites, running from 1927 through 1939, by which time Marie-Thérèse had been fully sup- planted by the intellectual photographer Dora Maar. But the Marie-Thérèse

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