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Eduardo Clark, The World of Lygia Clark, 1973, still from a color video, 27 minutes.

“Participation”

tk

Eduardo Clark, The World of Lygia Clark, 1973, still from a color video, 27 minutes.

IN NOVEMBER 1980 artists Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz inaugurated their project Hole-in-Space, a live two-way telecommunication event or, as they termed it, a “public communication sculpture.” Installed at Lincoln Center in New York and at a department store in Century City in Los Angeles, Hole-in-Space, which took place over three evenings, enabled passersby on opposite coasts to see, hear, and speak to one another in real time via life-size television images. On their website, Galloway and Rabinowitz describe the work in terms of immediacy and spontaneous interaction; it was a literal “hole” through which geographic space was compressed, “sever[ing] the distance between both cities.” The video documentation of this event, on view recently in the exhibition “The Art of Participation: 1950 to Now” at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, was presented on two oversize

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