reviews

  • Yael Bartana, Kings of the Hill, 2003, still from a color video, 7 minutes 30 seconds.

    Yael Bartana

    tk

    DISPUTATIOUS CLAIMS of belonging and emplacement; boundaries and flows; communication and misunderstanding; historical narratives in contradiction: These are the preoccupations of Yael Bartana’s postdocumentary, allegorical practice. Born in Israel in 1970, Bartana makes work that delivers resonant poetic-political reflections on the cultural, political, geographic, psychological, and religious irreconcilabilities of the Israeli and Palestinian peoples, who seem incapable, in their mutually reinforcing fears and misunderstandings and their reciprocal—indeed, at this point, ritualistic—gestures

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  • Eduardo Clark, The World of Lygia Clark, 1973, still from a color video, 27 minutes.

    “Participation”

    tk

    IN NOVEMBER 1980 artists Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz inaugurated their project Hole-in-Space, a live two-way telecommunication event or, as they termed it, a “public communication sculpture.” Installed at Lincoln Center in New York and at a department store in Century City in Los Angeles, Hole-in-Space, which took place over three evenings, enabled passersby on opposite coasts to see, hear, and speak to one another in real time via life-size television images. On their website, Galloway and Rabinowitz describe the work in terms of immediacy and spontaneous interaction; it was a literal

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  • Cildo Meireles, Desvio para o Vermelho: I. Impregnação (Red Shift: I. Impregnation), 1967–84, white room, red objects including carpet, furniture, electric appliances, ornaments, books, plants, liquids, paintings. Installation view, Tate Modern, London, 2008.

    Cildo Meireles

    tk

    IT IS NOT DIFFICULT to like Cildo Meireles’s work. It is, as he has said he wishes it to be, “instantly seductive”—intelligent as well as sensual, playful yet unsettling. And thanks to an excellent installation, this exhibition of the Brazilian artist’s work (organized by Guy Brett and Vicente Todolí) even managed to breathe life into Tate Modern’s often forlorn galleries, suddenly infusing them with a new, pulsating energy. A remarkable example of Meireles’s mathematics of seduction is the dramatically lit Mission/Missions (How to Build Cathedrals), 1987, which consists of two thousand

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