New York

Yael Bartana, Kings of the Hill, 2003, still from a color video, 7 minutes 30 seconds.

Yael Bartana

MoMA PS1

Yael Bartana, Kings of the Hill, 2003, still from a color video, 7 minutes 30 seconds.

DISPUTATIOUS CLAIMS of belonging and emplacement; boundaries and flows; communication and misunderstanding; historical narratives in contradiction: These are the preoccupations of Yael Bartana’s postdocumentary, allegorical practice. Born in Israel in 1970, Bartana makes work that delivers resonant poetic-political reflections on the cultural, political, geographic, psychological, and religious irreconcilabilities of the Israeli and Palestinian peoples, who seem incapable, in their mutually reinforcing fears and misunderstandings and their reciprocal—indeed, at this point, ritualistic—gestures of discipline and punishment, of forging a workable two-state solution. Yet Bartana’s work cannot be considered activist in any normative sense; it is best understood within a broader context of artists (e.g., Emily Jacir, the Atlas Group with Walid Raad) who hybridize conceptual structures,

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