vienna

Ree Morton, To Each Concrete Man, 1974, wood, canvas, PVC flooring, lightbulbs, electric fixtures, stretched rawhide, colored paper, pencil, paint. Installation view, Generali Foundation, Vienna, 2008.

Ree Morton

Generali Foundation

Ree Morton, To Each Concrete Man, 1974, wood, canvas, PVC flooring, lightbulbs, electric fixtures, stretched rawhide, colored paper, pencil, paint. Installation view, Generali Foundation, Vienna, 2008.

ONE OF THE EARLIEST WORKS in the Generali Foundation’s “Ree Morton: The Deities Must Be Made to Laugh: Works 1971–1977”—the first major institutional survey of the artist’s oeuvre in almost thirty years—was Untitled, 1971–73, a humble-looking assemblage consisting of pastel-painted wooden branches arranged in a kind of post-and-lintel structure. In the composition, a drawing on canvas has been stretched across the segment of wall defined by this structure, and on it, the Y shape of the weight-bearing vertical branches is repeated twice. Though certainly unassuming, Untitled was a somewhat provocative beginning: As both an early work and the first thing viewers saw, it announced the exhibition’s chronological organization—a risky proposition for any retrospective of a “rediscovered” female artist, given the historical tendency of art by women to be reduced to

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