sao-paulo

Renata Pedrosa

Galeria Virgílio

Two subjects have become conceptual pillars of the work of São Paulo–based artist Renata Pedrosa: the precariousness of life in large cities and the inexhaustible voracity for images. These topics acquired a more defined profile in 2001, when Pedrosa was commissioned by the cultural center of the Bank of Brazil to create a work of art adjacent to its historic building in downtown São Paulo. The artist constructed an undulating sculpture of Cor-Ten steel to function as a resting place for the bustling population that circulates daily in that highly concentrated urban area. After its inauguration, the work slowly became transformed into a trash repository and a wall for commercial posters, until the decision was made to remove it.

The episode had a transformational effect on Pedrosa’s production. Since that time she has been dedicated to creating impermanent works, sculptures made primarily

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.