new-york

Pablo Picasso, Couple, 1970, oil on canvas, 763⁄4 x 511⁄4".

Pablo Picasso

Gagosian Gallery

Pablo Picasso, Couple, 1970, oil on canvas, 763⁄4 x 511⁄4".

PABLO PICASSO CAN BE EXHAUSTING to think about. He seems to occupy a slightly unnatural amount of space in the scheme of things. When he died in 1973, he had been the most famous artist in the world for well over half a century, but virtually no one was thinking seriously about what he’d been doing lately. Despite the almost eerie diversity of his output, Picasso’s part in the development of Cubism remained, for many, his most significant contribution (one that he spent the remainder of his life attempting both to own exclusively and to destroy). Many of his midlife innovations and stylistic syntheses defined the look of “the modern” for successive generations of artists and serious viewers and then became a generic touchstone for an increasingly vast and unspecialized viewing public for whom Picasso’s celebrity and high prices were certainly more important than his advanced

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