New York

Frank Lloyd Wright, Herbert Jacobs House #2, 1943–48, Middleton, WI. Interior. Photo: Ezra Stroller. © Esto.

Frank Lloyd Wright

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum | New York

Frank Lloyd Wright, Herbert Jacobs House #2, 1943–48, Middleton, WI. Interior. Photo: Ezra Stroller. © Esto.

HALF A CENTURY AFTER PHILIP JOHNSON acidly proclaimed Frank Lloyd Wright “the greatest architect of the nineteenth century,” a new traveling retrospective makes the case for Wright’s relevance to the twenty-first. “Frank Lloyd Wright: From Within Outward,” organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, explores Wright’s expression of interior spaces on his buildings’ exteriors, as in the perfect example of the Guggenheim’s concrete coil. With a generation of architects modeling building shapes with functionally coded blocks of blue foam, external form is once again understood as an outgrowth of “program,” even if today this is more a representational tactic than, as for Wright, the realization of “organic” principles.

The urge to canonize Wright’s work according to a spatial strategy follows on the desire to bring him into the fold of those

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