new-york

Ida Ekblad

The Journal Gallery

For “Salty Sap Green Black,” her first solo exhibition in the United States, Oslo-based artist Ida Ekblad took us along on a scavenger hunt of sorts. Taking her cue from Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Gold Bug,” in which a man is believed to have been bitten by a mysterious golden insect that in fact helps him find buried treasure, the artist embarked on what she terms “drifts,” a means of collecting objects from around New York while “deconstructing habits of experience and discovering an area or a city.”

Ekblad crafted the nine sculptures that make up the ensuing series, “The Gold Bug Drift (NYC),” 2009, during these excursions, by encasing locally collected fragments of architectural fixtures, furniture, and other bits and pieces (found primarily at Rockaway Beach) within cement bases. Evocative of the archaeological remains of a ruined city, these totems of urban detritus were

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