new-york

Barthélémy Toguo

Robert Miller Gallery

Born in Cameroon in 1967 and now living in Paris, Barthélémy Toguo deploys various strategies to address the subject of cultural hybridity. Humor, parody, deliberate overdetermination, semantic dexterity, and medium-specific virtuosity are prominent among them, as was evidenced in this recent exhibition of work made over the past ten years. The mainstay of the show was a large installation to the rear of the gallery, which one entered through a curtain of white mosquito netting. Inside, the same material was draped, veil-like, onto a series of wooden cots stacked with clothes, evoking an African hospital ward of the kind set up by Catholic missionaries. The floor was tiled with banana-shipping boxes, with a monumental heap of stuffed-to-bursting blue-and-red-checked nylon shopping bags in one corner and an array of similarly full thrift-store suitcases in another. The installation thus

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