reviews

Haegue Yang, Yearning Melancholy Red, 2008, venetian blinds, mirror, moving lights, three sets of infrared heaters, fans, drum set, cables. Installation view, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, 2010.

Haegue Yang

tk

Haegue Yang, Yearning Melancholy Red, 2008, venetian blinds, mirror, moving lights, three sets of infrared heaters, fans, drum set, cables. Installation view, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, 2010.

THE WORLD CAN BARELY CONTAIN Haegue Yang. Since the mid-1990s, the Korean artist has navigated the streets of Seoul and the boulevards of Berlin with equal ease. Her installations, for which she is best known, follow suit. Although composed of such quotidian objects as venetian blinds and packing crates, they likewise move through a vast array of references, from Marguerite Duras to Marcel Broodthaers. Yang’s latest exhibition, too, was both a journey and a return, since the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis was the first US institution to show her works, in 2007.

Featuring a succinct collection of mostly small-scale pieces made in the last few years, the show lacked something in size and pomp but more than made up for this in the timeliness and scope of its tacit message. Yang poses nothing less than the problem of formalism: What is its place within today’s supposedly globalized

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the April 2010 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.