new-york

Ida Applebroog

Galerie Hauser & Wirth

There were many reasons to wonder just how to approach the work presented in Ida Applebroog’s recent exhibition at Hauser & Wirth. First was the practical question of how to get a complete picture of what was there, particularly when it came to the central element, a kind of schematic “house” in the main area of the gallery space. A smallish structure built from two-by-fours, whose “walls” were, in fact, made of tacked-up images, the house—since it offered no entryway—required viewers to peek and strain in order to look inside, not only granting them visual access to further images but also allowing only a partial view from any vantage point. Second, there was the logistical question of how to think about what, exactly, was on view: At once a historical show and a fully contemporary one, Applebroog’s “Monalisa,” in its combined components, spanned some forty years and worked to disable

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